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“I personally don’t think we should cancel John Wayne,” she said. “But way more important is, what are we going to do about the banking system, the redlining, the mortgages, the policing, all of those things that make it impossible for Black people to lift themselves up?”

In her book, she is surprised when she meets a young woman from Hanoi who has never heard of her incarnation as “Hanoi Jane.”

“Oh, I’ve been there a few times,” she told the young woman dryly.

No matter how many times she has apologized for an ill-advised photo op on a North Vietnamese antiaircraft gun, explaining that being antiwar did not mean she was against American soldiers, she knows that some on the right will never let her live it down.

“I think, just as there are some people who actually believe that Trump is doing a good job and has fulfilled all his promises, there are people who think that I was against the troops and that what I did was treasonous, and that probably will not change,” she said. “I never did let it stop me. I apologize. I try to explain the context. And then I move on.”

I wonder what she thinks about #MeToo and Hollywood. What was her experience?

“I was raped once by an actor,” she said, “and I had one director, who is a French director, who said, ‘Your character has to have an orgasm, so I have to see what your orgasms are like.’ And I just pretended I couldn’t understand him. He was talking in French.”

Would “Barbarella,” directed by her first husband, Roger Vadim, even be made now?

“Oh, ‘Barbarella’ could be made, but I would be one of the producers, and it would be a feminist movie,” she said. “It was almost a feminist movie. She flew the spacecraft herself, right? She was the one that the president assigned to go to the planet to save the scientist. She was already pretty good, OK?”



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