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In Michigan, the rioting that has rocked some cities across the nation has left Angela Daniels, 49, anxious and unsettled, too, though she is inclined toward the opposite political conclusion.

“We need stability and we don’t have that right now,” said Ms. Daniels, a psychotherapist from Southfield, a Detroit suburb. “That’s why I tend to lean toward Biden.”

As Mr. Trump increasingly uses the protests as a wedge issue, election analysts in both parties are taking a second look at a Marquette Law School poll of Wisconsin voters that came out in August. The share of Wisconsin voters expressing support for the protest movement that arose after George Floyd’s death dropped to 48 percent, from 61 percent in June.

Still, most Wisconsin voters said they didn’t like Mr. Trump’s handling of the protests. Fifty-eight disapproved, while just 32 percent approved, the poll showed. And Mr. Trump saw no improvement in his favorability rating after the Republican National Convention, according to an ABC News/Ipsos poll released on Sunday.

Mr. Biden who for years fashioned himself as a “tough on crime” Democrat, won the Democratic primary as an unapologetic moderate, defeating his democratic socialist chief opponent, Bernie Sanders. All summer and throughout their convention, Republicans sought to paint Mr. Biden as both soft on crime and overly punitive, a strategy that has yet to show it can define the Democrat to Mr. Trump’s advantage.

“They’ve been throwing all kinds of stuff at Joe Biden from the beginning,” said Representative Dina Titus, Democrat of Nevada. “It’s just a big, muddled message.”

Kathleen Gray, Maggie Haberman, Thomas Kaplan, Jonathan Martin, Adam Nagourney and Giovanni Russonello contributed reporting.



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